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Earth Climate News

Earth Science News. From earthquakes and hurricanes to global warming and energy use, read the latest research news here.

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Novel Coronavirus that recently emerged in China
The new cluster of viral pneumonia cases originating in Wuhan, China, marks the third time in 20 years that a member of the large family of coronaviruses (CoVs) has jumped from animals to humans and sparked an outbreak.

Mystery of Grand Canyon's water supply
Researchers looked at how scientists model the vulnerability of karst formations around the Grand Canyon. They then created a new model that can give land and water managers more information so they can better protect the water system.

Living near major roads linked to risk of dementia, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and MS
Living near major roads or highways is linked to higher incidence of dementia, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), suggests new research.

Sharp increase in Ningaloo whale shark injuries might be due to boat encounters
Almost one-fifth of the whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) in Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef Marine Park show major scarring or fin amputations, with the number of injured animals increasing in recent years, new research reveals.

A Zika vaccine could save suffering and costs
A new study found that routinely giving the Zika vaccine to women of childbearing age could save money if the risk of Zika is around that of other mosquito-borne diseases like dengue and chikungunya.

A new blood component revealed
Does the blood we thought to know so well contain elements that had been undetectable until now? The answer is yes, according to a team of researchers which has revealed the presence of whole functional mitochondria in the blood circulation. The discovery may deepen our knowledge of physiology and open up new avenues for treatment.

New experimental vaccine for African swine fever virus shows promise
Government and academic investigators have developed a vaccine against African swine fever that appears to be far more effective than previously developed vaccines.

Mechanism for how common gene therapy vectors enter cells
Researchers have identified a novel cellular entry factor for adeno-associated virus vector (AAV) types -- the most commonly used viral vectors for in vivo gene therapy. The researchers identified that GPR108, a G protein-coupled receptor, served as a molecular 'lock' to the cell. The discovery could one day enable scientists to better direct AAV gene transfers to specific tissues.

Evidence to explain behavior of slow earthquakes
A team of researchers has made an important breakthrough that will help better understand the origin and behavior of slow earthquakes. Their work presents unprecedented evidence that slow earthquakes are related to dynamic fluid processes at the boundary between tectonic plates. These slow earthquakes are quite complex, and many theoretical models of slow earthquakes require the pressure of these fluids to fluctuate during an earthquake cycle.

US households waste nearly a third of the food they acquire
American households waste, on average, almost a third of the food they acquire, according to economists, who say this wasted food has an estimated aggregate value of $240 billion annually. Divided among the nearly 128.6 million U.S. households, this waste could be costing the average household about $1,866 per year.

Bending with the wind, coral spawning linked to ocean environment
A research team has utilized modeling analysis to indicate that environmental factors act as a determinant in the timing of mass spawning.

The secret of strong underwater mussel adhesion revealed
Scientists have identified a mechanism of adhesive proteins in a mussel that controls the surface adhesion and cohesion. They substantiated the synergy of molecules in adhesive proteins. Their new discovery is expected to be applied in making stronger underwater bioadhesive than the conventional ones.

Tension between foreign climbers and Sherpas began over 200 years ago
Recent tragedies on Everest have exposed growing resentment felt by some Sherpas towards foreign climbers and the foreign companies profiting from the mountain. One source of dispute has been Sherpa concern that some climbers are not fit enough to cope with the altitude.

How moon jellyfish get about
With their translucent bells, moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) move around the oceans in a very efficient way. Scientists have now used a mathematical model to investigate how these cnidarians manage to use their neural networks to control their locomotion even when they are injured. The results may also contribute to the optimization of underwater robots.

Turtle tracking reveals key feeding grounds
Loggerhead turtles feed in the same places year after year - meaning key locations should be protected, researchers say.

Teens with obesity and PCOS have more 'unhealthy' bacteria
Teens with obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have more 'unhealthy' gut bacteria suggesting the microbiome may play a role in the disorder, according to new research.

Can a tiny invasive snail help save Latin American coffee?
While conducting fieldwork in Puerto Rico's central mountainous region in 2016, ecologists noticed tiny trails of bright orange snail excrement on the undersurface of coffee leaves afflicted with coffee leaf rust, the crop's most economically important pest.

Exposure to diesel exhaust particles linked to pneumococcal disease susceptibility
A new study shows that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) can increase an individual's susceptibility to pneumococcal disease.

Climate-friendly food choices protect the planet, promote health, reduce health costs
Increased uptake of plant-based diets in New Zealand could substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions while greatly improving population health and saving the healthcare system billions of dollars in the coming decades, according to a new study.

Here, there and everywhere: Large and giant viruses abound globally
Scientists have uncovered a broad diversity of large and giant viruses that belong to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) supergroup. As a result, virus diversity in this group expanded 10-fold from just 205 genomes, redefining the phylogenetic tree of giant viruses.