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Earth Climate News

Earth Science News. From earthquakes and hurricanes to global warming and energy use, read the latest research news here.

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New sequencing technology will help scientists decipher disease mechanisms
New technologies capable of sequencing single molecules in fine detail will help scientists better understand the mechanisms of rare nucleotides thought to play an important role in the progression of some diseases.

Marine algae from the Kiel Fjord discovered as a remedy against infections and skin cancer
Using state-of-the-art approaches coupled with bio- and cheminformatics and machine learning, researchers have succeeded in discovering new, bioactive components of the Baltic Sea Baltic Sea seaweed Fucus vesiculosus and its fungal symbiont against infectious bacteria or skin cancer.

In mouse study, black raspberries show promise for reducing skin inflammation
In a study done with mice, researchers found that a diet high in black raspberries reduced inflammation from contact hypersensitivity -- a condition that causes redness and inflammation in the skin.

Twenty-year study tracks a sparrow song that went 'viral
With the help of citizen scientists, researchers have tracked how one rare sparrow song went ''viral'' across Canada, traveling over 3,000 kilometers between 2000 and 2019 and wiping out a historic song ending. The study reports that white-throated sparrows from British Columbia to Ontario have ditched their traditional three-note-ending song in favor of a unique two-note-ending variant -- although researchers don't know what made the new song so compelling.

Arctic plants may not provide predicted carbon sequestration potential
The environmental benefits of taller, shrubbier tundra plants in the Arctic may be overstated, according to new research.

Algae as living biocatalysts for a green industry
Many substances that we use every day only work in the right 3D structure. Natural enzymes could produce these in an environmentally friendly way - if they didn't need a co-substrate that is expensive to produce to date. A research team has now discovered exactly the necessary enzymes in unicellular green algae.

Typhoon changed earthquake patterns
Intensive erosion can temporarily change the earthquake activity (seismicity) of a region significantly.

In the Arctic, spring snowmelt triggers fresh CO2 production
Studies have shown the Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the rest of the world, and its soil holds twice the amount of carbon dioxide as the atmosphere. New research finds that water from spring snowmelt infiltrates the soil and triggers fresh carbon dioxide production at higher rates than previously assumed.

Climate change threat to tropical plants
Half of the world's tropical plant species may struggle to germinate by 2070 because of global warming, a new study predicts.

Treatments tested for invasive pest on allium crops
Researchers field-tested 14 active ingredients in insecticides, applied in a variety of methods, to understand the best treatment options against the Allium leafminer, a growing threat to onions, garlic and leeks.

Higher concentration of metal in Moon's craters provides new insights to its origin
Life on Earth would likely not be possible without the Moon; it keeps our planet's axis of rotation stable, which controls seasons and regulates our climate. However, there has been considerable debate over how the Moon was formed. The popular hypothesis contends that the Moon was formed by a Mars-sized body colliding with Earth's upper crust which is poor in metals. But new research suggests the Moon's subsurface is more metal-rich than previously thought, providing new insights that could challenge our understanding of that process.

First confirmed underwater Aboriginal archaeological sites found off Australian coast
Ancient submerged Aboriginal archaeological sites await underwater rediscovery off the coast of Australia, according to a study.

Study confirms ultra music festival likely stressful to fish
A new study found that the Ultra Music Festival was likely stressful to toadfish.

Jellyfish-inspired soft robots can outswim their natural counterparts
Engineering researchers have developed soft robots inspired by jellyfish that can outswim their real-life counterparts. More practically, the new jellyfish-bots highlight a technique that uses pre-stressed polymers to make soft robots more powerful.

Mystery of subterranean stoneflies unlocked
Researchers may have unlocked a mystery surrounding unique aquatic insects in the Flathead watershed.

Influence of insect and microalgae feeds on meat quality
Worldwide there is growing demand for animal products for human nutrition, despite the popularity of plant-based diets. This means more feed is needed for animals. Future feedstuffs will need to be produced without exacerbating deforestation. Insects and microalgae are up-and-coming sectors to meet protein demands for humans and animals. Therefore, researchers nvestigated whether these alternative protein sources alter meat quality.

Different tracks, same dinosaurs: Researchers dig deeper into dinosaur movements
Using X-ray-based technology, researchers uncover shared subsurface movement patterns between birds and dinosaurs, adding a new dimension of fossil track diversity.

Alarming long-term effects of insecticides weaken ant colonies
Scientists have shown how even low doses of neonicotinoid insecticides, as they may realistically occur in contaminated soils, adversely affect the development of black garden ants (Lasius niger). This study highlights the need to overthink current deployment and management of chemical pest control for more sustainable agriculture.

Knowledge of severe storm patterns may improve tornado warnings
A radar signature may help distinguish which severe storms are likely to produce dangerous tornadoes, potentially leading to more accurate warnings, according to scientists.

Why do arteries age? Study explores link to gut bacteria, diet
Eat a slab of steak and your resident gut bacteria get to work immediately to break it down. But new research shows that a metabolic byproduct, called TMAO, produced in the process can be harmful to the lining of arteries, making them age faster.